- Advertisement -

Για ακόμα μια μέρα το National Geographic, μας χαρίζει ένα μοναδικό ταξίδι μέσα από το φωτογραφικό του φακό.

Εικόνες εμπνευσμένες από τις ζωές ανθρώπων, την καθημερινότητά τους, τις ασχολείες τους.
Βλέμματα που κοιτούν το φακό και πλημμυρίζουν το μυαλό με σκέψεις.

Δείτε τρεις φωτογραφίες που οι συντάκτες του περιοδικού δημοσίευσαν στα social- media και συγκεκριμένα στο instagram.

View this post on Instagram

Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto – From the project FIRST JOB – One’s first job is rarely forgotten. It is the beginning of adulthood, a rite of passage and a turning point. For numerous workers, only 30 years ago, the first job was often the only one, as people could remained in the same company for a lifetime, just being gradually promoted or slightly changing ones positions with seniority. In today’s scenario all is temporary, as the dream of a life position has forever vanished. Usually the first job is the first of a long list that will follow. In the wake of the worst economic crises in modern history, where for many young adults there seemed to be actually no possibility for a first job at all, I explore the world of employment of today’s youth. This is a project that will be carried out in all the 5 continents where the global theme does not obscure, but actually heightens the local specificities. Each one of the subjects whose portrait has been taken has an individual story that feeds into a larger narrative on how the world we live in is changing. From China to France, from Brazil to the U.S. we get a personal introduction to tomorrow’s workforce /// Shyamji Vishwakarma, 18 – Mumbai, India – Shyamji was born and raised in Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh. For 17 years he lived in the same house with his parents, 4 brothers, and 1 sister, but he moved to Mumbai a year ago. Now he lives with his cousin in Sangam Nagar, one of the city’s biggest slums. He’s a tool sharpener. He started this job, his first job, 7 months ago. His work basically consists of sharpening scissors and knives. He starts work every day at 10 a.m. and continues until 9 p.m., with a break of two hours for lunch. He has Fridays off. He gets paid on a per-day basis: 50% of whatever the shop earned that day. The daily average is between 0 and 450 rupees (7 USD). He says, “I want to learn this job in the best way possible and then I want to open my own shop.” #firstjob #job #india #mumbai #sangamnagar

A post shared by National Geographic (@natgeo) on

Απο το BELFAST ξεκινάει το όμορφο ταξίδι- Δείτε 10 πανέμορφες πόλεις…σκέτη μαγεία

Σαν Σεμπάστιαν: Έστω και μια φορά πρέπει να φτάσετε μέχρι εκεί…

View this post on Instagram

Photo and interview by @martinschoeller Religion: Nuyagi Keetoowah Society Ray Evans Harrell: I grew up in the O-Gah-Pah Nation in the current state of Oklahoma. Indian religions were banned in 1883, so I grew up in the Indian Baptist community of Picher, Oklahoma, directed music in churches and ended up studying in New York. In 1978 President Jimmy Carter signed the Freedom of Religion Act for American Indians and so for the first time we were able to "come out", so to speak. We started having prayer circles on a roof down on White street in Manhattan. I became the apprentice to a Cherokee Medicine Priest and am now the Priest for the Nuyagi Keetoowah Society. Our job is to uphold and bring back the knowledge of our culture. We obviously are not farmers and hunters, we are urban people, I am an opera singer, we're developing something in the present to live in this tradition. Our worship is meant to acquaint you with how to sense the environment in non-visual ways because one is really tied to whether something exists, by whether they can see it. Our religion is holistic in that it involves all seven senses. We meet at a Stomp ground and light three fires. We build a cornmeal circle and there are seven directions that we include because they represent the front, the back, the left, the right, the up, the down, the center. And then the eighth direction is to the universe. We call it a Medicine Wheel. It symbolizes that individually we are inadequate, we are limited. But when we put the circle together we can conceive of the whole of the reality, discover a greater truth for ourselves. Our message is that you are responsible for yourself and nobody escapes responsibility for what they do. The world is your teacher and you are to understand that you are a part of the Creator. Everything is a part of everything. For more of New York City's "Believers" check out @martinschoeller.

A post shared by National Geographic (@natgeo) on

 

- Advertisement -
ΔΕΙΤΕ ΕΠΙΣΗΣ